Papago GoSafe S810 dash camera review

Papago GoSafe S810 dash camera review

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There are thousands of hours of dash camera footage on YouTube, and for good reason. With a dashcam running in your car, it’s possible to catch everything from the amazing, to the unexpected, to evidence you may need in a court or insurance case. Papago has a new dash cam out that I’ve been able to try. It’s the GoSafe S810.

Read why you’d need a dash camera in my blog here

Papago Gosafe S810 review

The Papago Gosafe S810 is a dual camera, so it comes with both a larger front facing camera and a small rear facing camera.

In the box you’ll find both cameras, plus lots of cable to connect them to eachother and then to power. The front camera comes with both an adhesive mount and a suction cup mount, while the rear camera needs to be stuck in with included adhesive strips.

Installing Papago dash cameras

Installation is pretty straight forward, though getting the cables properly hidden and looking tidy can be a challenge.  You can either tuck the cords up into the windshield moulding, or purchase some inexpensive car cable clips off amazon to help keep things tidy. These cables aren’t so thick that you can’t flip them up under the windshield’s rubber moulding, so that’s a plus.

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To install the rear camera, you can run the cord and position the camera in whichever way you want since the camera has the ability to rotate or mirror  the video, or do both so you can hang it upside down. Wish I knew that before I stuck it up with the ultra sticky adhesive.

Papago GoSafe S810 Camera specs

The front camera features Sony’s Exmor sensor that renders an ultra-clear image at a resolution of 1080P at 30fps. The rear camera has a 120° field of view to catch license plates and close calls. Like most Papago dash cams, the GoSafe S810 has multiple recording modes, including Loop Recording, Motion Detection, and Monitor Mode. The S810 is also capable of supporting up to a 128 GB MicroSD card for extended recording time.

Camera records in 5 minute loops & in emergencies

The camera comes with a  16gb Micro SD memory card, which will hold about 24 hours worth of 5 minute looped videos. There were 33 stored on my card when I pulled it out after a few days, plus several “Emergency recordings” which are automatically write-protected if the camera detects a shock, major bump or crash.

Features: Papago GoSafe S810Papago gosafe dash camera review 810 how to

The camera has some interesting features. Of particular note is a Stop Sign Recognition mode, which can be turned on or off. As you approach a stop sign, the camera will emit a small audio blerp, and flash a stop sign on the back of the camera. There’s also Stop and Go alerts, where a similar audio tone is accompanied by a red and green light in the viewing window.

I don’t think I found these very helpful. While I could see the stop sign alert being handy, I don’t generally have trouble seeing or recognizing them. Similarly, I found the Stop and Go alerts really redundant to the point where they got annoying and I had to turn them off. The thing about being in stop and go traffic is that you know it. You’re in it and can see it. having the camera bleeping every time you advance and brake doesn’t tell me anything I don’t already know. These alerts also pop up when a light turns green at an intersection, which is kind of handy if you’re on your smartphone or daydreaming… but no one’s doing that, right?

There’s also a Driver Fatigue Warning, and Headlight Reminder helping you stay safe on the road.

The GoSafe S810 comes equipped with a built-in gravity sensor. In the event of a collision, it automatically saves the file, which is pretty much mandatory in dash cameras these days.Papago gosafe dash camera review 810 how to

There are plenty of settings and options for recordings on this camera.

Add-on options

This camera is compatible with a few add-on features you can buy separately. A GPS sensor tracks accurate location info and imbeds it in the video, while a Tire pressure sensor is also available.

Video Quality Papago GoSafe S810

You can control the view on the rear screen and see exactly what you want; either the front camera, the rear view or a split of the two. You can also turn the screen off if you find it’s distracting.

I have to say was really impressed with the video quality. The images are clear, bright, and easy to see, from both the front and the rear camera. Trying to screen the rear cameras feed on the tiny in car monitor was difficult, and I wasn’t sure I was actually going to end up seeing a lot. As it turns out the rear feed is pretty much as clear as the front. While I could not discern faces of the drivers behind me, it was easy enough to see what kind of car they are driving.

Certain lighting conditions proved challenging for both the front and rear camera also, reducing the car behind me to a generic shell, and rendering license plates in front illegible.

Wide angle lens

The camera has a very wide angle lens that lets you see a sweeping panorama in your driving videos.

Rear camera view

Overall, the video quality is good, when recorded in optimal lighting and weather, and it’s what you’d expect from a dash camera, but the multitude of times it gave me a sub-par video  (most often thanks to a poor angle of the sun) was somewhat disappointing, and felt like about 20-30% of the time the videos were just … OK. It’s hard to fault Papago, however, since the camera is in a moving vehicle and it’s constantly being repositioned into poor lighting angles.

Memory/storage on card

Files are stored on the card with a number and a letter; A-files denote the front camera, while B is the rear. You can view each event from either the front camera or the rear by matching the file numbers, which are organized in order on the card.

What to look for in a dash camera? Read this first!

Overall review: Papago GoSafe S810

Overall the convenience of having two cameras is pretty handy, and would be in a crash situation.  The video quality is good by and large, however lighting conditions can and do have a real impact on video quality.

You can read reviews of other dash cameras I’ve tried:

Papago Go Safe 760

ThinkWare X350

Cobra Drive HD

The Papago Go Safe S810 sells for about $200-250 from places like Best Buy or from Papago.
*A note about Affiliate Links: Occasionally I will include affiliate links in my reviews. I do this partly for convenience of the reader (since I’ll almost always include a link to the company website or similar anyway) in case you want to read more or purchase but I also may get a small commission from the click, which helps me keep the blog running. If you chose to use this link I thank you greatly for supporting the blog. There’s no obligation or cost to you for using this link.

Erin L

I'm a journalist, tech blogger, writer, TV producer, silversmith& jewelry designer, foodie and world traveler. I blog, write for publications, and supply freelance writing services to Calgary, and the world.

2 Comments

  1. raptor on August 10, 2018 at 11:10 am

    which do you recommend then the S810 or the 760?

    • Erin L on August 11, 2018 at 10:17 am

      Hi Raptor. I think they’re both good; Papago’s stuff is pretty solid. Which features are you deciding between?

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